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  Spousal visa
Common-Law Partner Visa
Conjugal Partner Visa
Dependant Child(ren) Visa
Parent and Grandparent Visa
Family-Based Provincial Nominee Visa
Remaining Relative Visa

Spousal Visa Canada

Family reunification is a vital component of Canada's immigration agenda. The Spousal visa allows applicants married to a Canadian citizen or permanent resident the unique opportunity to be sponsored along with their dependent children. The applicant and their spouse must be married and show the genuine and continuing nature of the relationship and intend to live together in Canada, upon approval.

A Canadian citizen or permanent resident who is living in Canada may be eligible to sponsor their spouse (same or opposite sex) and any dependent children for permanent residence in Canada. An application for sponsorship can be made for a spouse or partner who is living either inside or outside Canada.

Basic Requirements

A sponsor must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident living in Canada and be at least 18 years of age.

A sponsor is also required to agree to provide financial support for their spouse for three (3) years and any dependent children for up to ten (10) years. Those who have previously sponsored relatives to come to Canada may need to satisfy additional requirements to be eligible to sponsor their spouse.

A spouse must be legally married to their sponsor, in either a same-sex or opposite-sex marriage, that is legally valid and recognized by both Canadian law and the law of the country where the marriage occurred. Both a sponsor and spouse are required to meet additional requirements to apply for permanent residence and must undergo health and character checks.

Common Law Partner Visa

You are a common-law partner—either of the opposite sex or same sex—if:

  • you have been living together in a conjugal relationship for at least one year in a continuous 12-month period that was not interrupted. (You are allowed short absences for business travel or family reasons, however.)

You will need proof that you and your common-law partner have combined your affairs and set up a household together. This can be in the form of:

  • joint bank accounts or credit cards
  • joint ownership of a home
  • joint residential leases
  • joint rental receipts
  • joint utilities (electricity, gas, telephone)
  • joint management of household expenses
  • proof of joint purchases, especially for household items or
  • mail addressed to either person or both people at the same address.

Conjugal Partner Visa

This category is for partners—either of the opposite sex or same sex—in exceptional circumstances beyond their control that prevent them from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses by living together.

A conjugal relationship is more than a physical relationship. It means you depend on each other, there is some permanence to the relationship and there is the same level of commitment as a marriage or a common-law relationship.
You may apply as a conjugal partner if:

  • you have maintained a conjugal relationship with your sponsor for at least one year and you have been prevented from living together or marrying because of:
    • an immigration barrier
    • your marital status (for example, you are married to someone else and living in a country where divorce is not possible) or
    • your sexual orientation (for example, you are in a same-sex relationship and same-sex marriage is not permitted where you live)
  • you can provide evidence there was a reason you could not live together (for example, you were refused long-term stays in each other’s country).

Dependant Child(ren) Visa

As part of Canada's aim to foster family reunification, the Dependent Children visa allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents who are living in Canada to apply to sponsor their or their partner's dependent or adopted children.

Sponsors must be able to show that their children are still dependent upon them and/or the various requirements relating to the adoption of the children have been met. Once granted, dependent children will be given permanent residence and the right to join their sponsoring parent(s) in Canada.

 Canada’s citizenship law was amended to allow Canadian citizens who adopt a child from a foreign country the option of applying for Canadian citizenship for their adopted child without first having to apply for permanent residence. An application for Canadian Citizenship for a person adopted by a Canadian citizen (on or after January 1, 1947) is available. Adopted persons who are adults may apply for themselves.

Parent and Grandparent Visa

Applicants are required to show their relationship with their Canadian children and grandchildren. The Canadian sponsor(s) must also be willing to live in Canada with the applicant(s) and must be capable of supporting them financially without accessing public funds. Once granted, the applicant(s) will be given permanent residence and the right to join their Canadian children and grandchildren in Canada.

Basic Requirements

In order to apply for the Parental and Grandparental visa, applicants must possess children or grandchildren with Canadian citizenship or permanent residence living in Canada willing to sponsor them and provide evidence of sufficient income. The sponsor(s) must also sign an undertaking to provide for all of the applicant(s) basic needs for the duration of 10 years from the date the applicant(s) arrives in Canada. As such, the applicant must show that their sponsor(s) meet the required income levels so as to be able to provide for their needs during the undertaking period. In addition, all applicants are required to undergo health and character checks prior to their arrival.

Family-Based Provincial Nominee Visa

Under the Family-Based Provincial Nominee visa, Canadian citizens and permanent residents who are living in certain Canadian provinces can apply to sponsor their family members to live and work in Canada. The Family-Based Provincial Nominee visa allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents living in Canada to sponsor their relatives to a designated Canadian province. These currently include Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island.

Once granted, the applicants will be given permanent residence and the right to join their sponsor in Canada.

Basic Requirements

For the Family Based Provincial Nominee visa, applicants must meet specific requirements as set out below. All applicants are required to provide evidence of having a close family relative willing to provide support and assistance for the sponsorship, possess adequate English or French language skills and possess the required settlement funds.

Under the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) - Family Stream visa, applicants and their partner must be between the ages of 21 and 45, possess a combination of three years of full-time work experience and post-secondary school within the past four years. Applications are currently not being accepted under this category.

Under the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program(MPNP) - Family Support visa, applicants must be between the ages of 21 to 49, have completed post-secondary education of at least one academic year and received a diploma or certificate, have at least two years of full-time work experience within the past five years.

Under the Newfoundland & Labrador Provincial Nominee Program(NPNP) - Family Connection visa, applicants must be between the ages of 18 to 49, must have completed post-secondary education, training, or apprenticeship of at least one year in length that has resulted in a diploma, a certificate or a degree, and have at least one year of work experience. They must also have a full-time, permanent job offer from a local employer.

Under the New Brunswick Skilled Worker (NBPNP) - Family Support visa, applicants must have close family relatives in New Brunswick and satisfy the employment, language, experience, age, and adaptability requirements.

Under the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) - Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominees visa, applicants must be the non-dependent children of immigrants who were nominated under the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP). In addition, under the Nova Scotia Family Business Worker Stream family-owned businesses can hire close relatives who have skills that cannot be found locally.

Under the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) - Family Members visa, applicants must be between 18 - 49 years old, have completed the requisite educational requirements, and have a full-time, permanent job offer from a Saskatchewan Employer

Remaining Relative Visa

As part of the family reunification policy, Citizenship and Immigration Canada seeks to reunite families in Canada. For Canadians with no immediate family relatives in Canada or abroad, the Remaining Relative Visa allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to sponsor an extended relative from abroad.

The Remaining Relative visa allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents living in Canada to sponsor one relative regardless of age or relationship, if the Canadian sponsor does not have any relatives who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents or any other relative who may be sponsored under the family category. Once granted, the remaining relative(s) will be given permanent residence and the right to join their sponsor in Canada.

Basic Requirements

To apply for the Remaining Relative visa, applicants must have an extended relative who is either a Canadian citizen or permanent resident living in Canada with no living close family relatives. The Canadian sponsor must be willing to sponsor the remaining relative(s) and provide evidence of sufficient income. The sponsor must also sign an undertaking to provide for all of the applicant(s)'s needs for a specified period of time. As such, the applicant(s) must show that their Canadian sponsor meets the income requirements to provide for their essential needs during the period of the undertaking. In addition, all applicants must meet the required visa requirements including health and character prior to their arrival to Canada.

 
     
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